Lincoln, Nebraska Is The World

30 04 2012

And its juvenile citizenry is duly vibrant.

Lincoln Journal-Star
:

He was angry, and he wanted to take it out on someone.

So at 14, Jaden Jilg-Brown fought his mom’s boyfriend. Two days later, he was taken to the Lancaster County Youth Services Center. Six days later, as he sat in a cell at the detention center, his 1-month-old nephew died suddenly.

I’m going out on a limb and assuming that the infant nephew lived in the same household as his mother and her boyfriend, and also that the boyfriend had something to do with the infant’s death.  If that’s the case, then we have an example of the new male leader of a pride of lions both killing cubs and ejecting adolescents at the same time.

In Lancaster County, 81.4 percent of youth ages 10 to 17 are white, 5 percent are black, 3.7 percent are Asian, 1.1 percent are Native, 0.1 percent are Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander, 3.2 percent are of another race and 5.5 percent are of two or more races, according to the census. Another 8.2 percent are Hispanic, although that percentage isn’t included in the census’ racial categories.

The report examined trends in counties, including Lancaster, where it found white juveniles made up 64.3 percent of youth contacted by law enforcement. Native youth made up 2.7 percent, Asian youth 0.1 percent, Hispanic youth 8.3 percent and black youth 24.6 percent.

Nearly the same percentages of white and minority youth were given lesser penalties, such as citations or court summons, as were contacted by law enforcement.

Of juveniles referred to diversion, 78 percent were white, 16.7 percent black, 1.8 percent Asian, 0.3 percent Native, 0.8 percent Sudanese and 2.4 percent were of other races. Of juveniles who successfully completed jail diversion, 83.3 percent were white, 11.5 percent were black, 1.6 percent were Asian, 0.18 percent were Native, 0.7 percent were Sudanese and 2.7 percent were of other races.

(snip)

Among youth placed in juvenile detention in Lancaster County, 56 percent were white, 25.4 percent were black, 11.8 percent were Hispanic, 3.2 percent were Native, 2.2 percent were Asian and 1.4 percent were of other races.

(snip)

Of youth who were made state wards, 49.2 percent were white, 26 percent were black, 13.4 percent were Hispanic, 4.9 percent were Native, 4.5 percent were Asian and 2 percent were of other races.

Really, you don’t need me here, do you?

It’s kinda scary that Lincoln has so many Sudanese that they categorize them separately from native blacks.

To wit:

Sudanese families face many cultural barriers in America, he said, including having to learn new forms of discipline to replace physical discipline and taking greater personal responsibility for their children. In Sudan, parents often allow their entire village to help them raise their children. But in America, parents are expected to supervise their kids at all times, Machar said.

I can understand it taking a village, but does it have to take our village?

Blanca Ramirez-Salazar, executive director for El Centro de las Américas, said her agency’s Golden Warriors program works to help as many as 25 Latino boys, ages 14 to 18, stay out of the justice system. The program focuses on the ancient rites of passage of Aztec, Mayan and Inca warriors to help provide the boys clarity and purpose.

Don’t want to emulate all the ways of Aztec, Mayan and Inca warriors.  As Homer Simpson would say, “Mmmmm…human cardiac muscle.” If the coming-of-age rituals for young men in Aztec, Mayan and Inca societies is what you want, you can just as well have them in Mexico, Central America and South America, free of gringo’s juvenile justice system.

One more thing:  Look at two of the three photos this article provides as visual accompaniment.  If a U.S. Marine (yes, I know there’s no such thing as a “former” Marine) addressed me, I would at least WEAR A FLIPPIN’ SHIRT~!  And don’t sit on a desk.

H/T Stanford Sipple on Twitter.

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2 responses

30 04 2012
rjp

Regarding the lack of t-shirt, the photo caption says it all: Yovan Terrazas listens as Bill Dieckman, a marine, addresses members of a Latino youth group on the importance of respect and honor on Friday, April 27, 2012, at the Malone Center.

30 04 2012
countenance

Look at the second photo’s caption:

Thien Phan, 16, unbuttons his shirt before he and other Golden Warriors play basketball on Friday, April 27, 2012, at the Malone Center. The Golden Warriors provides a chance for young Latino men to gather and learn about their heritage and community.

“Thien Phan,” an odd name for a “Latino.”




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