Jericho We Are Not

1 01 2014

Your Blogmeister’s Desk

This the new year of 2014 is the year that St. Louis turns a quarter millennium old.  Officially the anniversary is observed on February 14, though the only thing historians are sure about is that the founding was in mid-February 1764.

We may not be 11,000 years old like Jericho, but 250 years still packs plenty of history.  And like Jericho, St. Louis has been under the jurisdiction of more than one real country, kingdom, principality or potentate in its 250 year history.  First France, then Spain, then France again, the USA, and at least theoretically and temporarily the CSA, (though the city itself was always strongly pro-Union), then back to the USA.

Also, the modern day descendants of the two founders of St. Louis, Pierre Laclede and Auguste Chouteau, still own a lot of the underlying real estate on top of which many Downtown skyscrapers currently stand.  However, they have bought and sold those parcels among each other over the many many many years, because the one and only piece of real state in St. Louis that has never been sold by its original owner under the legal system of a white country is the land on which the Old Cathedral sits.

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2 responses

2 01 2014
rjp

I was wondering, how could St. Louis be older than where I am from, the original Gateway to the West.:

Settled 1769
Established 1806
Incorporated 1836

Originally explored by the French, Wheeling still has a lead plate remnant buried by the explorer Céloron de Blainville in 1749 at the mouth of Wheeling Creek to mark their claim. Later, Christopher Gist and George Washington surveyed the land, in 1751 and 1770, respectively.

Oddly, where I am from is west of the Mason-Dixon Line. The M-D Surveyors turned north and created the Northern Panhandle of WV when warned of warring Amerinds – their original orders were to go to the Ohio River, they went north and still hit it.

2 01 2014
countenance

The meeting place of two major rivers, that’s how. It was thought that a town at the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers would be a good place to buy and sell animal furs and send them back to France.




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