With or Without

20 06 2016

College Station, Texas

A&M brags about more NAMs in spite of no affirmative action.

How were they able to pull it off?

Embracing the Top 10 Percent Rule

The decision for A&M to avoid considering race was made in 2003 after the Supreme Court ruled that the University of Michigan could use affirmative action in its law school admissions. Before that, Texas universities were bound by a 1996 ruling from the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals that affirmative action was unconstitutional.

The 1996 ruling led to Texas’ Top 10 Percent Rule, which promises automatic admission into public Texas universities for students who rank near the top of their high school’s graduating class. The rule ignores the SAT and other factors, which on average benefit white and Asian students, and was meant to ensure that a certain number of students from the state’s poorer, lower-performing schools can also get into a top public college.

Plain words, affirmative action.

The top ten percent rule that everyone in the top ten percent of their class gets in, whether it’s a none too rigorous ghetto or taco high school, or a difficult white or Asian school.  Meaning that D’Leiysha who was in the 91st percentile of her class at Martin Luther King High in Bell Curve, Texas gets in, while Blake who was in the 89th percentile of his class at this school doesn’t get it.


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8 responses

20 06 2016
Joshua Sinistar

I imagine that after the student loan bubble bursts that many of these so-called colleges and universities are going to be hit hard. After that collapse, it will be interesting to see if they can raise the money for a bailout after the economy has spiraled to such anemic levels.
Socialism is all fun and games until you run out of other peoples’ money. With White dispossession and replacement with tax sucking brown people, they’re gonna be hard pressed for any more bailouts. TARP was probably the last roundup for pork barrel spending. From now on its downward spirals as far as the eye can see. Retail outlets are closing. Banks are closing branches. All the cities are already broke and begging for State and Federal money to pay their bills. I expect Illinois or California to seek bankruptcy proceeding soon as their taxpayers have been fleeing like crazy. After the first State files, there will be a mad rush by many other states who are going bust from Depression 2.0. The federal government must be running on fumes. They can’t afford to default on the debt so I expect programs are going to suddenly start seeing shortfalls and mysterious cuts will begin to appear as they run out of funds.

20 06 2016
AnAnon

this system is gameable in that students can transfer to bad schools for their last year and essentially take those top 10% spots so its not a long term solution.

21 06 2016
Olorin

Gotta generate new debt-takers-outers now that the housing bubble burst ya know. This is Section 8 for the Ed Biz.

21 06 2016
a guy

It’s not the 10% rule. Inner city kids don’t want anything to do with A&M (the school is in the middle of nowhere and the culture is firmly red state rural and militaristic).

It’s the Hispanics that now make up the largest plurality and soon outright majority of the state’s college age population.

21 06 2016
countenance

That’s another thing. A&M’s minority growth is described as a growth in “blacks and Hispanics,” and I thought in the back of my mind that of “blacks and Hispanics,” most of the growth is coming from only Hispanics, not much from blacks. It’s a verbal sleight of hand, and alludes to one my running themes: The moving goalpost of the definition of diversity.

22 06 2016
a guy

That is correct.

They were not lying about their attempts to attract yoots though. My favorite method is how they used to (and probably still) bus distinctly inner city highschoolers to the school during the school year with the intent of showing them around and encouraging them to enroll.

I am 100% certain this accomplished the exact opposite of their intent.

22 06 2016
a guy
21 06 2016
jb

California state universities are already facing budget restraints. Their response is to double down on political correctness and cut real courses. Don’t kid yourselves, there is a difference between money and power, though the two are almost inevitably linked. How many black South Africans really deserve to be in their formerly good universities?

This wouldn’t be so bad if they didn’t water down the curriculum and didn’t have trash courses. Most of the talented tenth from the bottom tenth (or quarter) would soon flunk out. Those who excel could then be said to deserve the gift.




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