Big Eugenics Brand

16 05 2017

Chino Hills, California

ESPN:

He’s planned this since he first saw his wife, Tina, walking down the halls at Cal State Los Angeles. She was a college basketball player too, but more important, she was tall enough to give him tall children. That was a must. And she was tough. He could tell by the way she walked in her heels.

“How many tall girls wear heels?” he asks. “I liked that.”

So he looked her up and down with his pale green eyes, smiled and said, “You and me, we’re gonna do something. You just don’t know it yet.”

It was a line he’d used on other women. He’d drop the line, linger on her eyes, then keep walking. He wasn’t waiting for a response. He was planting a seed.

“You may not like me. You may think I’m cocky or arrogant,” LaVar says, explaining the pickup line, and his worldview.

“But you will be thinking about me.”

(snip)

“I knew I was gonna have more than one [son],” LaVar says. “I don’t put out no girls. … Me being alpha dog in our family, I’m gonna have boys. Gimme three boys.”

Well, what if one of your boys wasn’t athletic? Or wasn’t into basketball?

“Wasn’t going to happen,” LaVar says.

How could he be so certain?

“Speak it into existence,” he says. “Keep talking about it until it happens.”

It’s an interesting experience talking to a man as loud and cocksure as LaVar Ball, who seems wholly unconcerned with convincing you of anything. Most characters of his ilk have a need to be liked. Not LaVar. He sees things his way. He trained his boys his way. Now he’s promoting them … his way. “I know me better than you do,” he says. “I know my boys better than they do.”

That’s not a household, and not a family.  That’s a eugenics experiment.

Then again, that’s true for a large percentage of families and households.  Especially now in the Bell Curve era.  Richard Herrnstein’s definition, not mine.

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