Simplified Shelby

13 01 2018

USA

Shelby Steele, in the WSJ:

Black Protest Has Lost Its Power

Have whites finally found the courage to judge African-Americans fairly by universal standards?

The recent protests by black players in the National Football League were rather sad for their fruitlessness. They may point to the end of an era for black America, and for the country generally—an era in which protest has been the primary means of black advancement in American life.

There was a forced and unconvincing solemnity on the faces of these players as they refused to stand for the national anthem. They seemed more dutiful than passionate, as if they were mimicking the courage of earlier black athletes who had protested: Tommie Smith and John Carlos, fists in the air at the 1968 Olympics; Muhammad Ali, fearlessly raging against the Vietnam War; Jackie Robinson, defiantly running the bases in the face of racist taunts. The NFL protesters seemed to hope for a little ennoblement by association.

And protest has long been an ennobling tradition in black American life. From the Montgomery bus boycott to the march on Selma, from lunch-counter sit-ins and Freedom Rides to the 1963 March on Washington, only protest could open the way to freedom and the acknowledgment of full humanity. So it was a high calling in black life. It required great sacrifice and entailed great risk. Martin Luther King Jr. , the archetypal black protester, made his sacrifices, ennobled all of America, and was then shot dead.

For the NFL players there was no real sacrifice, no risk and no achievement. Still, in black America there remains a great reverence for protest. Through protest—especially in the 1950s and ’60s—we, as a people, touched greatness. Protest, not immigration, was our way into the American Dream. Freedom in this country had always been relative to race, and it was black protest that made freedom an absolute.

It is not surprising, then, that these black football players would don the mantle of protest. The surprise was that it didn’t work. They had misread the historic moment. They were not speaking truth to power. Rather, they were figures of pathos, mindlessly loyal to a black identity that had run its course.

It’s not even that complicated.

Black protest has “lost its power” because it never had any real power to begin with.

The reason black people still have “a great reverence for protest” is because they don’t understand the concept of correlation-causation.  Their relatively ancient ancestors developed rituals based on confusing correlation and causation.  For instance, some kid would dance around a tree just to be goofing off, and then it would start raining, and then on another day, the kid would do it again, and it would start raining.  From that, everyone in the tribe started in on dancing around the given “magic” tree if they wanted it to rain, and sometimes it would work, sometimes not.  Likewise, “modern” black Americans maintain something of the same magic-totem-ritual mentality about marching and protests, that all one has to do is engage in them, and good things come your way.  A la the cargo cult.

It’s as simple as this:  The civil rights movement’s biggest legislative wins had nothing to do with black people marching or even black people in general.  Yes, black people marched, and yes, the civil rights movement won, but not because the former caused the latter, more like the latter caused the former.  A bon mot of mine, relevant because of what is coming up on Monday, is this:  MLK didn’t cause the CRM, the CRM caused MLK.  Sans MLK, the CRM still would have happened.

The real causes of the CRM are twofold:  One, Jews gaining control of crucial American institutions in the decade of the 1920s, and two, the fallout of World War II.  The country, by that time, Jewish predominated in many of the crucial institutions, that consummately lauded itself for having helped to beat Hitler in Berlin, could not have turned around and continued to tolerate segregated lunch counters in Greensboro and walls in Nogales.  Which means the civil rights and immigration legislation of the 1960s were inevitable, the only open variables were names, dates and proper nouns.

At approximately the same time frame of the American CRM, many other white countries enacted similar measures.  And I know for sure there was no Martin Luther King in those other countries.

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Don’t They Know, It’s Not the End of the World

28 11 2017

Bakersfield, California

Jim Goad on the Manson postmortem.

He doubts the Bugliosi theory on motive, but Bugliosi got too much credible evidence that that was indeed what was going through Charlie’s dope-addled brain.  My long time fundamental point remains, though:  If the blacks were smart enough and organized enough (LOL) to do all that, then they would have been able to rule the world on their own, and they wouldn’t have needed Manson and his vagabonds.

Which leads me to this from Goad:

Manson was indeed a product of the 1960s, but more than anything he was the product of a teenaged alcoholic mother/prostitute and the doomed path such a bedraggled spawning set him on. By the time of the Tate/LaBianca murders, Manson had already spent half of his life in correctional facilities of one sort or another. And if he developed negative attitudes toward blacks, it likely had far less to do with reading George Lincoln Rockwell and far more to do with being forced to interact with blacks behind bars during his formative years. He was not nearly as naive about race as so many who’d condemn him for being a “racist” are.

MLK was murdered a year before the Manson Family murders. Riots had sprung up all across the USA. As a street hustler and lifetime con, Manson had the survival instincts that so very few pampered modern leftist scribes will ever have. If he foresaw an inevitable race war in America, maybe he was nothing more than a hillbilly Bob Dylan and saw it blowin’ in the wind.

If Manson was truly prophetic about anything, though, it was why whites would lose a theoretical race war. According to Manson, when blacks came seeking blood vengeance, whites would be too hopelessly split between those with self-preservation instincts—those who are now defamed as “racists”—and the uptight, sheltered squares who thought it would be “racist” not to let black people start killing them en masse.

You can’t blame someone who was living through the times and maybe also the proximity of the severe black riots of the latter half of the ’60s to think that it was the beginning of the end of the world.  But as things shook out over time, it wasn’t the end of the world, just a really severe chimpout.  Remember, they can sprint, but only for a short distance and a short time.  Also remember that if they had brains, they would truly be dangerous, but thankfully, they’re not that dangerous.  Both belie Manson’s fanciful prediction about what were the immediate years and decades ahead of his time.

Why did the riots stop?  Why has black rioting since then rarely been anywhere as bad?  Hint:  Compare Baltimore 1968 and Baltimore 2015.

Answer:

Affirmative action.

The domestic policy deep state really hit the floor on the accelerator on affirmative action as a reaction to the late ’60s black riots.  The subversive purpose of AA was, and continues to be, to drive a wedge between the “talented” tenth and the street undertow, so that the former group of black people feel more loyalty to the system than to their own lumpenproles.  Which means the “talented” tenth won’t feel any need to lead and organize and provoke their own racial undertow to riot against the system.  Remember, if they had brains, they’d truly be dangerous, which means if you can take what brains they have out of the ghetto and send them to Yale, then there won’t be any brains left in the ghetto, which means they’ll be even less dangerous than before.  The result has been a success, considering the subversive purpose:  Black riots after the early ’70s have been both far less widespread and far less severe.  The biggest I can think of in the AA era is South Central Los Angeles 1992, and eventually, we all know how the system solved its South Central black undertow problem:  Mass Hispanic immigration as vanguard, AFFH-style programs as rearguard.

The domestic policy deep state made the decision a long time ago that it is preferable to have half-wit blacks dance around on Yale and have their Fisher-Price toy kiddie pool “academic disciplines” to allowing them to lead major urban domestic instability.

Meanwhile, as the events in many cities and areas about a century ago proved, East St. Louis included, and as we saw in spits and spurts as recently as Boston in the mid-1970s, you don’t want to be on the wrong side of a white riot, because one of those can turn the world inside out.





Half a Millennium

14 11 2017

Wittenberg, Germany

Because I’m a Lutheran, LCMS in particular, I’ve been aware that the current year is the 500th anniversary of the 95 Theses, because the Church(es) all year have been making sure we know about it.  Strangely, ELCA has been rather mum about it, mainly because nowadays ELCA is leftist as just about any Christian denomination, and as such, they’re trying to put daylight between themselves and Martin Luther’s none too kind attitude about parentheticals in his late life.  That said, get ready for Martin Luther to be Robert E. Lee-ized.

However, I was not able to get back enough of my cognitive function on the observed day of the anniversary itself, October 31, (missed it by that much), such that I was really able to appreciate the significance of the day.  I should add that October 31, 1517 is observed as 95 Theses Day, but the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar didn’t happen until later that century.  When the switch was ordained, ten days were skipped over, meaning that the day that was supposed to be October 5, 1582 became October 15, 1582.  This means that October 31, 1517 on the Julian is probably November 10, 1517 on the Gregorian, give or take.

Before I leave this be, I want to address the “it never happened” historical revisionist skepticism.  Their theory is that Martin Luther never nailed or even affixed any manifesto like this to the doors of the Wittenberg church where he was based, that he made the whole thing up about 30 years after the fact and after the Protestant Reformation gained serious political steam and became a thing in order to puff up his own legend.  What I think is possible is that he never “nailed” the 95 Theses to the doors with nails, if only because in those days, nails were expensive, and not a one was to be wasted.  But I do think that he actually did affix the Theses to the door, probably with glue, and did it on the night before All Saints’ Day, meaning October 31, 1517 (again, remember, Julian calendar), and where’s why:  Affixing clerical-professorial statements to church house doors was the way that the clerical-professorial class communicated with each other in those days, and they wrote their statements in Latin for that reason, because it was for the eggheads, not the common people.  Luther never really wanted to split away from the Church, he just wanted some massive major league internal reforms.  Which explains the Theses being originally written in Latin, and being affixed to the doors before ASD, because in those days, ASD was a BFD, way bigger than it is even among modern Catholics.  An official professorial statement that dramatic officially posted on the eve of ASD would have gotten paid attention to big time by the really important clerical officials of the day, just because of the importance of ASD.

Other anniversaries during my incapacity were:  The 40th anniversary of the plane crash that took out most of Lynyrd Skynyrd, and the 100th anniversary of the Bolsheviks taking control of Russia. You know how that goes, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Bolsheviks, Martin Luther, one of these things is not like the others.





My Unique Take on the Orange Crowned God-Emperor’s North Korean Bellicosity

14 11 2017

Pyongyang

I’m going to start with the conclusion and then conclude with the reasoning.

CONCLUSION

This is our last chance to win the Korean War.

REASONING

I have written in this space on several occasions in the last few years that we are in the Era of Peak Boomer, that is, the zenith of the Baby Boomer generation’s ability to exercise serious control over serious and consequential institutions.  So much so that we’re on our third President whose birth is part of the direct “nine months later” consequences of the orgasmic exuberance of the circumstance and aftermath of V-J Day.  Three Presidents, born Summer 1946.  Including the current one.

The first wave of the Boomers are currently in their last gasp of power and influence over serious institutions, and at the same time, are the last people who can exercise that kind of power who have any conscious memory of the Korean War, even though they were just little kids (ages 4-7 if you’re a Summer ’46er) during Korea.  The later you were born, the younger you were when Korea happened, meaning that even if you were alive, you have no conscious memory of it at all, and if you were born after July 1953, you weren’t even alive at all.

Yet and still, whether you were just barely old enough to know what was going on in Korea, or whether you were born after it was over, you had older relatives who were Korean vets, and they inevitably did the woulda-coulda-shoulda thing.  You grew up hearing all that griping.

Donald J. Trump both probably was just old enough to understand that we were at war in Korea when it was happening, and probably heard a lot of the woulda-coulda-shoulda kvetching in his ears as he got older from that point.  He just turned seven when we got out of Korea, and any seven-year old boy who doesn’t see his country emphatically win a war, especially since his very birth was a consequence of his country winning a really big war, is going to have his young male ego hurt.

And now, he’s President, and Korea is still divided along post-July ’53 lines.

See where this is going?  He thinks he can finish the job and close the loop on what got him butthurt at the age of seven.

Presuming the Constitutional process continues after Trump, and as you know, I don’t think it will, this is the last President we’ll have that was alive during the Korean War.  If we have another Boomer President, it will be late Boomer type, a 1959 birth year type, born after Korea, and by the time a 1959 birth year individual got old enough to understand such things, the woulda-coulda-shoulda-ism re Korea dissipated as our attention turned to another Asian civil war, that being Vietnam.  This means that the Trump Administration is last Presidency with “skin in the game” motivation to “win” the Korean War in the way the American foreign policy establishment thinks we should win it slash should have won it.  Speaking of, “our” official goal of “denuclearizing” the entire Korean peninsula is nothing more than a dog whistle for either the internal toppling or the external conquering of the DPRK, and subsuming its territory into the ROK.  There is no other credible route for there to be no nuclear ordinance on the Korean peninsula.  Which means that “denuclearization of the Korean peninsula” is a humanitarian-sounding front for what would in all essence be adding territory to the American Empire, i.e. winning the Korean War once and for all.  The stalemate is that the growing Chinese Empire wants the territory that is now the DPRK to be its protectorate, not ours.

Long and short is that since Korea is still divided, we still think we can win it, and we now have as a Commander-in-Chief someone who wants to win it for personal reasons.

Incidentally, that is why we gave up on Vietnam in the long run, in spite of all the very similar woulda-coulda-shoulda-ism on the part of Vietnam vets that still takes place to this day, (including that on the part of a man who is on the other side of a wall from me right now whereas I write this), because Vietnam didn’t stay divided, the Paris Accords didn’t hold, the North ignored them and overran the South and created a North-ran unitary Vietnam.  If that had not happened, there’d still be separate North and South Vietnams to this day, with a DMZ between them, and we’d still be treating Vietnam like we’re treating Korea, which is, a thing we can still win in the long run.

My late older blood uncle, my late uncle-by-marriage, and my late great uncle, are all Korean vets, the middle one is technically a casualty but one who didn’t succumb to the war injuries until 1988.  Incidentally, my younger blood uncle, who I just alluded to above, the one who you know, thanks to Norm, is one of the three principals of my existence right now and has been since July 19, the others being Norm himself and my lawyer, all of them have legal rights therein, is a Vietnam vet.  So as you can see, I have a plenty of blood and quasi-blood relative investment in eastern Asia.  So what I’m about to write, I’m not writing out of a sense of disloyalty or sedition.  And I know I’m gonna hear from a few people.  But I have to say it anyway:

Those gooks aren’t worth it.  Nary a bone of a single Pomeranian grenadier.





Twilights of Rage

16 06 2017

Miami

OCGE reversed some of Obama’s last moment Cuba policy changeups, and insinuates that none of them will go back in that direction until, among other things, Havana hands over Joanne Chesimard, aka Assata Shakur.

ICYMI, here’s a long but excellent book review that’s probably as worthy as the book itself, that puts, among other people, the lovely and gracious Miss Chesimard, into context.  We think it’s never been worse, but the 1970s make our times look Halcyon.





We’re About to Open an Early ’80s Time Capsule

16 06 2017

USA

* Cannonball Run reboot.

* Atari reboot.

Could silver ghettoblaster boomboxes be far behind?





Garden State of Mind

11 06 2017

New Jersey

Slashdot:

Before Silicon Valley, New Jersey Was Tech Capital

It was in New Jersey that Thomas Edison invented sound recording, motion pictures, and the light bulb in what is considered the first modern corporate R&D facility. In other words, Edison invented the modern lab — teams of people working together, sharing ideas and perfecting devices. In the century after Edison, New Jersey became the place to set up shop if you wanted to invent. On top of all the other assets, the state had lots of inexpensive land available. The transistor and cellular communications came out of AT&T’s Bell Labs, also in New Jersey. If it was 1955 and you had to bet on where the next half-century of technical innovation would emerge, the Garden State would be the most likely winner, not some farmland south of San Francisco. As a couple of Jersey natives at NPR note, it didn’t quite work out that way. What happened?

I’ll take a stab.

(1) Average January high in Newark is 39, in Palo Alto 58.  Average annual snowfall in Newark is 28 inches, in Palo Alto, none.  Average annual rainfall in Newark is 46 inches, in Palo Alto 16 inches.

(2) Father Lewis Terman and son Fred Terman.  That father-son combination was brilliant and Machiavellian, and exploited the best parts of the raw drive for human intelligence, measurement and selection, California’s one-time individualist-libertarian political climate, and channeling a lot of Federal military-defense R&D money into the area.

(3) New Jersey is smack dab in the Bos-Wash northeastern Acela corridor, which for a long time has had a business climate focused on large corporations.  I am of the opinion that the personal computer could have never been invented or popularized by the big three-letter Acela corporations, because, as far as they were concerned, computing only concerned large corporations, and therefore, individuals and their households had no use or need for them.  It took the California individualist-narcissistic mentality (that it once had) to fathom an individual even wanting a computer.  For the same reason, historically, team sports were popular in Eastern industrial towns, while they weren’t that much in California.  Because team sports carried the same connotation as team employment or team industry, the large corporation, the large factory.  Olympic style sports, which are generally more individual than team affairs, were both popular in and sometimes grew out of, a place like California, because of its (former) atomistic-libertarian climate.

(4) “Had lots of inexpensive land.”  By 1955, that wasn’t so true in New Jersey anymore, but it was true “south of San Francisco.”

(5)  The Termans, Fred especially, developed the business-academic mentality, again, rooted in what California’s political climate used to be, of the Stanford-to-startup pipeline.  This new industry generally attracted people who were, along with being highly geeky and intelligent, also highly entrepreneurial.  So, if their two options were corporate slave in New Jersey or roll-your-own between San Francisco and San Jose, guess where they were going to go.

(6)  Part of what hurt Edison and New Jersey insofar as motion pictures is that certain ((())) intent on ripping off Edison’s IP set up shop fairly close to the Mexican border, so they could quickly schlep across it if process servers came calling.